Science Serving Maryland's Coasts

On the Bay

A Passion for Peelers

Michael W. Fincham • July 17, 2015
Bank trapping for peeler crabs still goes on in the lower end of Maryland's Eastern Shore. Down in Somerset County watermen like John Barnette can set out traps along sparsely populated stretches of rivers like the Wicomico, the Manokin, the Big Annemessex and the Little Annemessex.  Read more . . .
 
Ecologist Bert Drake and research equipment

Poll Finds Marylanders Trust Scientists on Climate Change

Jeffrey Brainard • June 30, 2015
Many Americans disagree with the scientific consensus that human activities are largely responsible for causing climate change. But that's not the end of the story: scientists at Maryland universities came out tops when pollsters asked citizens whom they trusted most for information on climate change.  Read more . . .
 
fish under a net in a water tank

Growing Veggies with Fish, Part 2 (Slideshow)

Daniel Strain • June 10, 2015
Lettuce, chard, kale -- and tilapia. These can go together on a dinner plate, but it’s unusual to see them growing together in the same place. Nevertheless you can see just that at this Aquaponics Project operated in a small farm facility in the middle of Baltimore by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.  Read more . . .
 

Prepping for Peeler Crabs

Michael W. Fincham • May 15, 2015
Crabbers in Maryland usually start working weeks before the blue crabs start moving out of the mud where they overwinter. That’s especially true for the handful of watermen who set up bank traps designed to catch peelers, hard crabs that are getting ready to molt, to shed their shells and morph, for a brief period, into soft crabs.  Read more . . .
 
fisher holding bait bag on pier

Campaign Warns Anglers That Live Bait Worm Trade Carries Invasive Species

Jeffrey Brainard • May 4, 2015
To reduce the spread of aquatic invasive species, a project led by Maryland Sea Grant educated fishers to properly dispose of the seaweed packaging used to ship blood worms. The message: please throw away the packaging in the trash, don't drop it into the Bay.  Read more . . .
 

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